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Anonymous’ Airchat Aim: Communication Without Need For Phone Or Internet

concertina226 (2447056) writes “Online hacktivist collective Anonymous has announced that it is working on a new tool called Airchat which could allow people to communicate without the need for a phone or an internet connection — using radio waves instead. Anonymous, the amorphous group best known for attacking high profile targets like Sony and the CIA in recent years, said on the project’s Github page: ‘Airchat is a free communication tool [that] doesn’t need internet infrastructure [or] a cell phone network. Instead it relies on any available radio link or device capable of transmitting audio.’ Despite the Airchat system being highly involved and too complex for most people in its current form, Anonymous says it has so far used it to play interactive chess games with people at 180 miles away; share pictures and even established encrypted low bandwidth digital voice chats. In order to get Airchat to work, you will need to have a handheld radio transceiver, a laptop running either Windows, Mac OS X or Linux, and be able to install and run several pieces of complex software.” And to cleanse yourself of the ads with autoplaying sound, you can visit the GitHub page itself.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



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Time Travel in Google Maps

Originally posted on Innocent Bystanders:

In 20 years this will be a really cool feature:
Every day, Google’s Street View cars capture massive amounts of data and the company then publishes them on Google Maps at regular intervals. Until now, the only images you could see on Google Maps were the latest images. Starting today, however, you will also be able to go back in time and see older images.

When you’re in the Street View interface, you will now see a small clock icon on the page. Once you click that, a preview image with a timeline underneath it will appear and allow you to see the older images.

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[Image borrowed from Tech Crunch site]

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Red HTC One M8 Leaks For, You Guessed It, Verizon

Originally posted on Deepak verma:

If there’s one thing Verizon’s known for, it’s high prices. Errr, constant changes that end up costing consumers more money. No, that’s not right either. Umm…red! That’s it. If there’s one thing Verizon’s know for (aside from high prices and finding ways to charge customers more money) it’s red.
April 24, 2014 at 05:04AM

http://nblo.gs/WenaC

By Deepak verma

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World’s Best Mom

kevlar:

Amazing story!

Originally posted on Alive In You:

That’s a lofty title, I know. And believe it or not, I know her. Even more amazing (to me) is that I’m married to her.

One might think the world’s best mom would be someone with years of motherly experience and a number of kids — someone who has been doing it for a long time. My wife, Katie, doesn’t come close to qualifying under those terms. You see, we’re new parents. Our first son, Randol Thomas, was born on Thursday at 12:56 a.m. at the incredibly young gestational age of 25 weeks and 4 days. That happy moment had a sad ending when our baby boy lost his life later that morning at 5:20 a.m. after struggling for hours to try and breathe with what we knew were severely underdeveloped lungs — something we knew would be an issue after my wife’s water broke at just 18 weeks.

So how could…

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OpenSSL: the New Face of Technology Monoculture

chicksdaddy writes: “In a now-famous 2003 essay, ‘Cyberinsecurity: The Cost of Monopoly,’ Dr. Dan Geer argued, persuasively, that Microsoft’s operating system monopoly constituted a grave risk to the security of the United States and international security, as well. It was in the interest of the U.S. government and others to break Redmond’s monopoly, or at least to lessen Microsoft’s ability to ‘lock in’ customers and limit choice. The essay cost Geer his job at the security consulting firm AtStake, which then counted Microsoft as a major customer. These days Geer is the Chief Security Officer at In-Q-Tel, the CIA’s venture capital arm. But he’s no less vigilant of the dangers of software monocultures. In a post at the Lawfare blog, Geer is again warning about the dangers that come from an over-reliance on common platforms and code. His concern this time isn’t proprietary software managed by Redmond, however, it’s common, oft-reused hardware and software packages like the OpenSSL software at the heart (pun intended) of Heartbleed. ‘The critical infrastructure’s monoculture question was once centered on Microsoft Windows,’ he writes. ‘No more. The critical infrastructure’s monoculture problem, and hence its exposure to common mode risk, is now small devices and the chips which run them.’”

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Google Opens Up Street View Archives From 2007 To Today

mpicpp (3454017) writes with news that Google is publishing all Street View imagery back to 2007. Quoting Ars: “The feature hasn’t rolled out to many accounts yet, but it looks like a small, draggable window will be added to the Street View interface. Just move the time slider around and you’ll be able to jump through past images. Granted, Street View has only been around for a few years, so the archives only go back to 2007. A few of the events Google suggests browsing through are the building of One World Trade Center and the destruction and rebuilding of Onagawa, Japan after the 2011 earthquake. Besides being really cool, the move will save Google from having to choose a canonical Street View image for every location. If the current image is blacked-out or wrong in some way, you can just click back to the previous one.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



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How Silk Road Bounced Back From Its Multimillion-Dollar Hack

Daniel_Stuckey writes: “Silk Road, the online marketplace notable for selling drugs and attempting to operate over Tor, was shut down last October. Its successor, Silk Road 2.0 survived for a few months before suffering a security breach. In total, an estimated $2.7 million worth of Bitcoin belonging to users and staff of the site was stolen. Some in the Silk Road community suspected that the hack might have involved staff members of the site itself, echoing scams on other sites. Project Black Flag closed down after its owner scampered with all of their customers’ Bitcoin, and after that users of Sheep Marketplace had their funds stolen, in an incident that has never been conclusively proven as an inside job or otherwise. Many site owners would probably have given up at this point, and perhaps attempted to join another site, or start up a new one under a different alias. Why would you bother to pay back millions of dollars when you could just disappear into the digital ether? But Silk Road appears to be trying to rebuild, and to repay users’ lost Bitcoins.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



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Apple Fixes Major SSL Bug In OS X, iOS

Trailrunner7 writes: “Apple has fixed a serious security flaw present in many versions of both iOS and OS X and could allow an attacker to intercept data on SSL connections. The bug is one of many the company fixed Tuesday in its two main operating systems, and several of the other vulnerabilities have serious consequences as well, including the ability to bypass memory protections and run arbitrary code. The most severe of the vulnerabilities patched in iOS 7.1.1 and OSX Mountain Lion and Mavericks is an issue with the secure transport component of the operating systems. If an attacker was in a man-in-the-middle position on a user’s network, he might be able to intercept supposedly secure traffic or change the connection’s properties.”

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NIST Removes Dual_EC_DRBG From Random Number Generator Recommendations

hypnosec writes: “National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has removed the much-criticized Dual_EC_DRBG (Dual Elliptic Curve Deterministic Random Bit Generator) from its draft guidance on random number generators following a period of public comment and review. The revised document retains three of the four previously available options for generating pseudorandom bits required to create secure cryptographic keys for encrypting data. NIST recommends that people using Dual_EC_DRBG should transition to one of the other three recommended algorithms as quickly as possible.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



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Ask Slashdot: How Can We Create a Culture of Secure Behavior?

An anonymous reader writes “Despite the high news coverage that large breaches receive, and despite tales told by their friends about losing their laptops for a few days while a malware infection is cleared up, employees generally believe they are immune to security risks. They think those types of things happen to other, less careful people. Training users how to properly create and store strong passwords, and putting measures in place that tell individuals the password they’ve created is ‘weak’ can help change behavior. But how do we embed this training in our culture?”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



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